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History Miami

Miami, FL
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History Miami, Miami FL

Description

History Miami is a colorful, hands-on museum that kids and adults love. It is located in a grotty area of downtown near the courthouse and public library, where there are quite a few homeless people. The museum is housed in two buildings and the newer one was our favorite. Here, kids absolutely adore writing on the chalkboard wall that winds around the first gallery room. There are chalk ink markers to use. We couldn't get our daughter to leave! Objects from very recent history such as a hotel switchboard and a Cuban raft are displayed in this room.
The true strength of this museum lies in how beautifully it is curated. The objects are displayed on very colorful shelves in a gorgeous, balanced layout.
The second downstairs room is even prettier. Objects from nearby islands such as Haiti or Trinidad are displayed in bright yellow, lime-green and orange cases. There is a steel drum, ceremonial drums, santeria garments and headdresses, Haitian metalwork, and a Cuban birdcage (so beautiful!).
Another strength of this museum is that there is always something hands-on for kids to do, which is so smart! Adults can read the plaques while kids touch the interactive items. In this room, kids love the domino sets with colorful sides that catch the light.
Upstairs there are temporary exhibits. Hands-on items for kids to play with include colorful hats and eyeglasses made of wood on sticks. What fun!
The second building is less appealing, as the displays are more worn and there is a musty smell. Downstairs kids can color. Upstairs kids love to go inside the old streetcar, serve pretend food on the house patio, and play with historical toys like a wooden alligator. The sounds inside the streetcar and the sailor music in the maritime exhibit add a nice effect.
Walk next door to Government Center and take the People Mover to Bayside Marketplace for lunch- kids love the People Mover!
For more hands-on fun for kids, check out Miami Children's Museum. For more Cuban culture, go to Calle Ocho in Little Havana.

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Photo Gallery

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Outside History Miami, looking toward the Miami-Dade Public Library.
Outside History Miami, looking toward the Miami-Dade Public Library.
Kids can draw on the chalkboard that wraps around the entire room!
Kids can draw on the chalkboard that wraps around the entire room!
Cuban raft.
Cuban raft.
Orange Bowl jacket, Celia Cruz dress, satellite phone/ photo transmittal system used to report after Hurricane Andrew, and archaeology finds at the Sunlife Stadium site such as glass bottles.
Orange Bowl jacket, Celia Cruz dress, satellite phone/ photo transmittal system used to report after Hurricane Andrew, and archaeology finds at the Sunlife Stadium site such as glass bottles.
Dancers in Nicaragua, performing as a beast, wear a wooden horse mask such as this.
Dancers in Nicaragua, performing as a beast, wear a wooden horse mask such as this.
Haitian rada drums, played during Vodou ceremonies.
Haitian rada drums, played during Vodou ceremonies.
Cuban cigars, by El Credito Cigars, which moved to Miami from Cuba after the Cuban Revolution in 1959.
Cuban cigars, by El Credito Cigars, which moved to Miami from Cuba after the Cuban Revolution in 1959.
Cuban birdcage made by Manuel Vega.
Cuban birdcage made by Manuel Vega.
An activity where you can knot fabrics of your choice onto the wall.
An activity where you can knot fabrics of your choice onto the wall.
Seminole Indian dolls, Palmetto frond arts, and tools used in cattle ranching and sugarcane harvesting.
Seminole Indian dolls, Palmetto frond arts, and tools used in cattle ranching and sugarcane harvesting.
Trinidadian steel drum (these were originally made from oil barrels), Guatemalan weaving, Haitian kites, and jaw bone used in Peruvian music.
Trinidadian steel drum (these were originally made from oil barrels), Guatemalan weaving, Haitian kites, and jaw bone used in Peruvian music.
Haitian metal art of La Serine (a deity of the sea), marine taxidermy, and Orisha/Santeria textile.
Haitian metal art of La Serine (a deity of the sea), marine taxidermy, and Orisha/Santeria textile.
Haitian kites with fringed edges that make a pleasing sound in the wind.
Haitian kites with fringed edges that make a pleasing sound in the wind.
Yellow coronation dress for a Santeria/Orisha initiation ritual, and tables with bright dominoes.
Yellow coronation dress for a Santeria/Orisha initiation ritual, and tables with bright dominoes.
Hearts, masks, and hats on sticks to hold above your head!
Hearts, masks, and hats on sticks to hold above your head!
Kids like to play in the plantation house upstairs.
Kids like to play in the plantation house upstairs.
The trolley is fun for kids to ride in.
The trolley is fun for kids to ride in.
Haitian Manman drum, Trinidadian Tassa drum, and Bahamian Tom Tom and Cowbells.
Haitian Manman drum, Trinidadian Tassa drum, and Bahamian Tom Tom and Cowbells.
Colorful room!
Colorful room!
   

Directions

History Miami is located at 101 West Flagler St, Miami FL 33130, call (305) 375-1492.
Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Sun 12-5. Closed on most government holidays.
Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for students and seniors, and $5 for children aged 6-12.
Parking in the Miami-Dade Cultural Center Garage is discounted by the museum if you bring your parking ticket to the visitor desk. The address for the parking lot is 50 NW 2nd Ave.
We paid $5 for parking in an outdoor lot on NW Miami Ct.

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Visitor Ratings

Overall Visitor Rating: Unrated.

Last Updated Thu, 10 Dec 2015 13:08:49 GMT